Friday, March 24, 2017

Week 26 -- POOT Testimony and Projects

Sam's Homeroom:

This week we went further into the Place Out of Time trial. Looking further at the testimony of Tom Joad, each student wrote a reply to an initial comment made by some other member of the simulation. In this way, the kids are not only responding to testimony but also critiquing and furthering others responses, which requires a different type of thinking.

Separate from, but related to the simulation, each student was asked to brainstorm a few topics for a long-term project that somehow builds on their character's life and times. Each project will lead to the creation of some kind of artefact (that's educational jargon for a tangible, physical or digital product). So far the ideas for the projects run the gamut from designing clothing and putting on a fashion show, to investigating the impact of minor technical tweaks to the performance of an RC-car, to short graphic novel biographies, and more traditional slideshow presentations or formal reports. We will be working on these projects well into May, each week taking time to think about the next steps. 

 Above: Tomoe Gozen taming a horse.
Monday's Warm Up asked the students to draw their
POOT character doing something typical.
Below: Coco Chanel making a dress.



On Tuesday the whole middle school went to see the Ann Arbor Symphony perform several pieces of classical music at Hill Auditorium; the highlight was the loud booming bass drums at the beginning of selections from Stravinsky's Firebird Suite.

The class has been getting so good at completing the Perplexors (grid logic puzzles) that this week we moved on to a different kind of logic puzzle that involved thinking about missing letter combinations in words--a mini-spelling lesson in addition to a logic puzzle.

Sam's 5/6 Math

This week we spent some time reviewing concepts relating to percents, especially calculating discounts and markups with an emphasis on using a 10x10 grid to help us think about what quantity in each problem represented 100% and then figuring out what 1% would be so that other percents could be calculated more easily. (Singapore Math calls this the Unitary Method).
We also took a look at concepts surrounding averages: calculating the total (sum) based on an average, finding the value of one item from the average and information about the other items, recalculating the average of a subset when members of known value are removed from the group.

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